Review: Simgot EW200 Maze – Nearly Flawless

The EW200 is defined by an immaculate physical presence as well as a beautiful sound.
The EW200 is defined by an immaculate physical presence as well as a beautiful sound.

The Simgot EW200 sound practically perfect, with unprecedented finesse at their low price point.

Thank you to Linsoul for providing the Simgot EW200 for review.

Simgot is fairly renowned in the world of IEMs. My audiophile journey started with the single dynamic driver Simgot EN700Pro. They really opened my eyes, or rather ears, to the novel experience of what kind of sound a single DD can achieve. They remain a favorite.

Simgot has moved into focus again recently with the release of a few new single DD models – the EA500, EN1000, and EA2000, in the range of USD$80-$300. They entered the budget market with the EW100P. Their next and latest model in the budget section is the EW200.

The EW200 is defined by an immaculate physical presence as well as a beautiful sound.
Bottom Line

I have never been so incredibly impressed by a pair of IEMs in this price range. The highly revealing tuning is perfectly balanced with a healthy dose of bass. The note weight is not compromised to extract the finest details. The open and well-articulated stage, precise imaging, carefully constructed three-dimensional notes, and sheer resolution are unparalleled in this price range. And on top of it, the EW200 have the build to match the sound! The mirror-finish solid metal construction looks very premium, and the small size ensures a comfortable fit. They are the best of both worlds, and my love for them will likely never wane.

What We Like
  • Controlled, powerful, and wonderfully textured bass slam
  • Highly transparent and detailed midrange
  • Brilliant and well-extended treble
  • Sharply defined crisp notes with a nearly life-like presence
  • Airy, spacious, and well-rounded soundstage with a very clean background, meticulous imaging, and outstanding separation
  • Exceptionally dynamic, engaging, and overall stupendous presentation
  • The full metal construction with mirror-finished surface feels very premium
  • Very easy to drive
What We Don't Like
  • A slightly better assortment of ear tips would be welcome
  • Carrying case does not offer any actual protection

Given my already unforgettable experience with the EN700Pro, I was really looking forward to experiencing the EW200. And to say the experience was merely impressive would be an understatement.

Unboxing and First Impression

Technical Specifications

  • Driver: Single 10mm dynamic driver with double-sided vapor deposited silicon crystal polymer diaphragm, N52 dual-magnetic-circuit, and dual-cavity design
  • Construction: Closed
  • Shell: Mirror-finished alloy metal
  • Impedance: 16Ω
  • Frequency Range: 10-50kHz
  • Sensitivity: 126dB@1kHz
  • Cable: 2-pin High-purity silver-plated OFC Cable
The imprint of an actual maze is rather unique.
The imprint of an actual maze is rather unique.

Packaging

The packaging is small but attractive.

Simgot does not just mark their models with a model number. They also assign a unique name to each of them (which is seldom used in discussions.) The EW200 are named Maze.

The name, model number, and an actual maze are printed on the box’s top cover. On the back, the vital information is listed in both English and Chinese, along with a sample FR curve.

In the box

  • EW200 IEMs
  • 2-pin cable
  • 3 pairs of narrow-bore semi-transparent white silicone ear tips (S, M, L)
  • Soft cloth carrying case
  • Warranty, user manual, and other literature

Inside the box, the IEMs sit inside a foam cutout. The carrying pouch is in a cardboard box below, along with some literature, and the cable and the ear tips are in a small box on the side.

The soft cloth carrying pouch carries no branding. It does not offer any actual protection from external impacts, but it is sufficient for carrying the IEMs in my pocket.

The ear tips are generic with narrow long bores, but the material is high quality.

The accessories are packed neatly in their own sections inside the compact box.
The accessories are packed neatly in their own sections inside the compact box.

Cable

The stock cable is constructed of two strands, with one silver and one golden-colored wire inside each strand. The combination has a touch of luxury around it. The transparent insulation is very soft and pliable. The hardware is relatively cheap plastic though.

This is a well-built, lightweight, and high-quality cable for the price.

The cable is tangle-free.

Design

Simgot has made the EW200 with absolute finesse. The mirror-like finish and the subtle brandings make them all the more gorgeous. The full metal build is sturdy but is on the heavier side.

There are two vents, one on the side and one near the nozzle. The nozzle is of medium length and diameter.

Comfort and isolation

The overall size of the IEMs is relatively small, and they sit inside my ears quite snugly. The fit is comfortable, and I can barely feel their weight. The isolation is good, and I note no pressure build-up in my ears.

The compact metal construction feels premium.
The compact metal construction feels premium.

Internals

Simgot has used a dynamic driver with a new type of ‘Revolutionary SCP (silicon crystal polymer) Diaphragm.’

“This diaphragm incorporates a special polymer film as a substrate that is coated with a hybrid silicon layer through a dual-sided sputtering deposition. Combining the strengths of DLC and LCP diaphragms, it maintains the high-density mid-range performance of LCP diaphragms and the extended, exquisite high-frequency response of DLC diaphragms.” – Simgot

This DD also has a powerful N52 dual-magnetic circuit and dual cavities, supposedly enhancing the dynamic range and transient response.

The golden/silver construction of the silver plated OFC cable is simply gorgeous.
The construction of the silver-plated OFC cable is simply gorgeous.

Sound

The EW200 left me slack-jawed in bewilderment with their incredible sound quality!

This pair of IEMs have a sound that, although following the immensely popular Harman-2016 target frequency response curve, is unlike anything I have heard before. The sound signature is highly revealing, exceptionally dynamic, and wonderfully composed. It won me over almost immediately.

Frequency response curve of the Simgot EW200, measured on an IEC-711 compliant rig.
Frequency response curve of the Simgot EW200, measured on an IEC-711 compliant rig.

The tonality is largely neutral with a slightly boosted bass but never boring. The tuning is bright yet quite refined. I have yet to experience this sound for USD$100, much less around $40—moreover, the low impedance and the high sensitivity guarantee efficient driveability across all sources.

Using the single-ended output, I tested the EW200 with the Fosi Audio DS2 and the Oppo Reno 7 5G.

Bass

The bass is controlled yet wonderfully textured and vigorous.

The released FR curve of the EW200 did not prepare me for the magnificently textured and robust bass slams they deliver. And yet somehow, they never really get into your face. Instead, the rumble and slam mark a definitive, justly timed, and very satisfactory presence.

The sub-bass goes really deep and has a wonderful timbre and clearly defined textures. The midbass slams hard but never feels bloated. The notes have proper weight to make them sound natural. Furthermore, every last bit of detail is produced clearly. The amazing dexterity evident in this section is quite magical.

Even in the busiest tracks, I can clearly distinguish between the powerful kickdrum slams and deep basslines. The electronic bass drops generate the correct amount of pressure without masking the rest of the frequency range. The double bass generates a guttural and reverberating response. The energy in this section is transpired properly without any exaggerated focus.

The EW200 has a balanced sound based on a healthy well textured bass coupled with a bright tonality.
The EW200 has a balanced sound based on a healthy well-textured bass coupled with a bright tonality.

Midrange

The midrange is portrayed in breathtakingly ultra-HD resolution.

The midrange is exquisite. It stunned me from the very first track. The level of transparency is outstanding. The notes are sharply defined, suitably bodied, but devoid of unnatural spikes – making them surprisingly palpable and refined. This is no lush midrange; the tonality is neutral, yet it is highly engaging overall.

Male vocals sound appropriately throaty and distinctly textured. They do not sound overly full for that extra organic touch but remain sufficiently real. The grittiness in the voice is exposed quite appreciably without being unduly grainy. Despite being sharply defined, the vocals sound pretty analog to my ears.

Female vocals are considerably vibrant. The raw power, the underlying emotions, the rough textures, the silky tune – all of them are brought forward effortlessly. They sound unrestrained, presenting everything they have to offer with no holds barred. Uncomfortable peaks are kept in check as well.

Instruments are recreated with sharp precision. The notes are crisp, crunchy, and three-dimensionally defined. Despite the knife-like edge definition, they never feel thin or wispy. The EW200 play the organic notes of cello and acoustic guitar, the funky electric guitar riff, the elegant tunes from violins and saxophones, and the melodic notes of lute with equal proficiency.

The highly polished surface of the earpieces reflects like a mirror.
The highly polished surface of the earpieces reflects like a mirror.

Treble

The EW200 have a brilliantly sparkling, well-extended, and awe-inspiring treble response.

The treble has an exhilarating presence. It sounds slightly forward and bright but not overly in your face. Both the lower and upper treble are equally and abundantly energetic. The notes have a tactile presence. Together they create the most ethereal treble response I have ever encountered below USD$100.

Cymbal strikes sound unapologetically clear and thrilling. Hi-hat rolls are prominent in the mix. The notes are well-defined, which, combined with the impressive energy, provides a magical thrill. I really cannot get enough of them.

The nozzle is of medium length and has a metal grill at the front.
The nozzle is of medium length and has a metal grill at the front.

Soundstage, imaging, and details

The soundstage is well-proportioned and clean, with sharp imaging.

The EW200 stun with an amazingly open and airy presentation. The background is absolutely spotless. The width, height, and depth of the stage are all extended, creating an excellent, well-rounded holographic presentation. The separation is outstanding, and the imaging is very accurate in the headspace.

In my previous experience, Harman-2016 curve-based tuning almost always comes off as boring or uninspiring. The EW200 are a complete departure from that. The sound is exceptionally dynamic, with quite prominent macrodynamics and remarkable microdynamics. The notes are very much tangible, and the details are meticulously recreated.

The cable hardware, despite being made of plastic, are made with precision.
The cable hardware, despite being made of plastic, is made with precision.

Comparisons

Vs. Shozy T1 Pro

The T1 pro are a single DD IEM from Shozy priced at around USD$50, with a unique, almost open-back construction. The shell is made of transparent plastic with three big vents on the rear. The driver unit is directly mounted behind the nozzle. The DD has a composite PU/PEEK diaphragm.

The T1 pro have a darker and bassier sound, with a slight peak at the lower treble, making them sound spicy. The upper treble is more rolled off. The bass is considerably bigger than the EW200 but has less prominent textures. The midrange is more recessed and has a smaller body.

The EW200 have a more clean and more three-dimensional presentation. The notes of the EW200 also feel more real. Overall they have a much more refined tuning compared to the T1 Pro.

Vs. NF Audio RA10

The RA10 are a budget single DD IEM from NF Audio, consisting of a 6mm micro dynamic driver with a polymer diaphragm. The tuning is based on the optimized diffusion field and HRTF (Head Correlation Transfer Function). They are priced at around USD$50.

The RA10 majorly lack low-end. The bass extends well but lacks the body to exert a definitive presence. Textures are reproduced fine, though. The midrange is pushed forward, with slightly bigger notes. The Treble has a tiny bit more body and a more forward presence. The soundstage feels rather two-dimensional, with width and height but little depth.

The EW200 have a wondrously delightful low-end with more voluminous slam and rumble. The midrange is slightly pushed back in comparison, but the details, presence, and note definition are similar. Treble has slightly less body but comparable extension and energy. The soundstage is more spacious and three-dimensional.

Overall, they sound more engaging than the RA10’s relatively dry presentation.

The EW200 outperforms 2-3 times costlier gears with ease.
The EW200 outperforms 2-3 times costlier gear with ease.

Where to Buy

Conclusion

I have never been so incredibly impressed by a pair of IEMs in this price range. The highly revealing tuning is perfectly balanced with a healthy dose of bass. The note weight is not compromised to extract the finest details. The upper midrange might sound a bit shouty to some, but it sounds tastefully energetic to me.

The perfect balance between the macro and micro-details is also surprising for the low price. The open and well-articulated stage, precise imaging, carefully constructed three-dimensional notes, and sheer resolution are unparalleled in this price range. How has Simgot pulled off this unbelievable tuning at an outrageously low price?

And on top of it, the EW200 have the build to match the sound! The mirror-finish solid metal construction looks very premium, and the small size ensures a comfortable fit. They are the best of both worlds, and my love for them will likely never wane.

The Simgot EW200 are an enigma. They are currently my most preferred pair of IEMs below $150. Frankly, none of the IEMs I have heard in this region stand up to the EW200 in terms of resolution, musical engagement, and dynamics. Simgot has created a true benchmark that will likely go unchallenged for quite a while.

5 comments

  1. Great review. Getting mine tomorrow. Can’t wait! You might want to add a Daft Punk track to your sub bass list!

  2. Thank you for the review!
    How would you rate this monitor in terms of head to soundstage distance?
    I’m trying to find a good iem in this price range to produce and mix music with a laptop while traveling, and i need holographic presentation, good and defined height and width and some sort of separation between my head and what i hear as to imagine a studio speaker setup in front of me and being able to take good decisions on frequency response, layering and reverbs … Am i asking too much? 😀
    Do you have any other recommendation on the price range between 50 and 150$?
    Thank you

    1. You are not asking too much.

      This pair does all of what you are asking. It projects sound in a well-proportioned three-dimensional soundstage with very good separation.

      Under $150 I have not heard another one that sounds so natural and yet projects sound like this. This is my default recommendation.

      1. Thank you!
        Wrote also a comment in your head-fi review, dunno why as i could write here directly 😀
        Have you tried the KZ ZS10ProX? I’m using them accompanied by a 7Hz 71, but i think the timbre of both the IEM and DAC is giving me a bump in the low end which is bleeding into the midrange covering it in part… I already ordered some new tips as i tried the Spinfit CP145 and the technology enriched the highend, but i wanted some more distance from my head so i’m waiting for a pair of Dunu S&S as they say they are the best for soundstage. But i’m really starting to doubt the problem is related to the tuning of the IEM, what you think?
        Also, they speak so well about the Simgot EA500 which costs 20$ more the EW200, have you tried them and could compare?
        Thank you so much!

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